Charles Koch Phone Number, Contact Details, Whatsapp Number, Office Address, Email Id

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Charles Koch Bio Data :

In addition to being the co-owner and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Koch Industries, Charles Koch is also a philanthropist and businessman from the United States. Charles Koch and his younger brother David acquired the business from their father, Fred Koch, who created the company in 1940 and passed it down to the next generation. The brothers, particularly Charles, were instrumental in the expansion of the company and its development into one of the largest privately-held corporations in the United States of America.

Charles was born as one of four sons into an industrialist family, and he showed signs of intelligence and hard work from an early age. He was also an exceptionally bright student who went on to study engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he received two Master’s degrees, one in mechanical engineering and the other in chemical engineering. Following the completion of his education, Charles worked for a while for Arthur D. Little, Inc. before joining the Rock Island Oil & Refining Company, which was founded by his father.


He rose through the ranks to become the company’s president, and the company was renamed Koch Industries in honor of his father. He also has a political interest, and he and his brother David have made considerable financial contributions to libertarian and conservative think tanks and campaigns over the course of their careers. He is a prolific philanthropist who has donated millions of dollars to promote research, public policy, and educational programs throughout the world.

Charles Koch’s parents, Mary and Fred Chase Koch welcomed him into the world on November 1, 1935, in Wichita, Kansas. His father was an engineer who went on to become an industrialist, eventually founding what would become Koch Industries. Charles has three brothers, named Frederick, David, and William. Frederick, David, and William are the oldest.

He enrolled at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to pursue a degree in mechanical engineering. In 1957, he graduated with a Bachelor of Science in general engineering and a Master of Science (M.S.) in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois. He subsequently went on to pursue another Master’s degree in chemical engineering, earning his M.S. in that field in 1960. Following graduation, he began working at Arthur D. Little, Inc. Although this job lasted just a brief period of time, he returned to Wichita in 1961 to work for his father’s company, Rock Island Oil & Refining Company, which he joined the next year.

By the late 1960s, he had grown into a hardworking young man with a strong desire to expand the family business, which had grown into a medium-sized oil company. In 1967, he was appointed president of the company, which he renamed Koch Industries in his father’s honor that year. Since then, he has also served as the company’s Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer.

Charles Koch Phone Number

He was appointed to the board of directors of Koch Industries in 1982, and he currently serves on the boards of directors of a number of other firms, including Entrust Financial Corp. and Georgia-Pacific LLC, which manufactures paper and pulp products.

As a result of Charles Koch’s leadership, the Koch Industries saw an extraordinary rate of expansion, and it now has a presence in around 60 nations across the world, employing more than 100,000 people worldwide.

Koch Industries has invested more than $70 billion in acquisitions and other capital expenditures over the last few years, and the company now owns Invista, Georgia-Pacific, Molex, Flint Hills Resources, Koch Pipeline, Koch Fertilizer, Koch Minerals, and Matador Cattle Company, among other enterprises.

A concept that Charles Koch devised, Market Based Management (MBM) is credited with helping him achieve his extraordinary success, according to Charles Koch. In his 2007 book, ‘The Science of Success: How Market-Based Management Built the World’s Largest Private Company,’ he goes into great length on his philosophy of management.

Market-Based Management (MBM) ideas are taught to students, educators, community leaders, and government officials by the Market-Based Management Institute, an educational non-profit that works in cooperation with Wichita State University to spread the word about MBM (WSU).


He considers himself to be a libertarian and supports free-enterprise legislation and advocacy organizations. A number of free-market-oriented educational groups, including the Cato Institute, the Institute for Humane Studies, the Bill of Rights Institute, and the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, have received his assistance. Charles Koch, as co-owner, chairman of the board of directors, and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Koch Industries, has played a major role in the transformation of the company from a medium-sized enterprise to one of the largest privately-held corporations in the United States. Koch Industries has also received more than 930 accolades for its efforts in the areas of safety, environmental excellence, community stewardship, innovation, and customer service, among other things.

In 1994, the American Legislative Exchange Council honored him with the Adam Smith Award, which he accepted. The New York Mercantile Exchange’s Directors’ Award for Global Vision in Energy was given to him in 1999, and he was honored with it. The Spirit of Justice Award, given by the Heritage Foundation in 2003, was bestowed to him.

In 2005, the Association of Private Enterprise Education presented him with the Herman W. Lay Memorial Award in recognition of his achievements. In 2011, the Philanthropy Roundtable presented him with the William E. Simon Prize for Philanthropic Leadership, which he accepted.

Charles and David Koch, in full Charles de Ganahl Koch and David Hamilton Koch, also known as the Koch brothers (born November 1, 1935, Wichita, Kansas, U.S.; born May 3, 1940, Wichita—died August 23, 2019, Southampton, New York), were American brothers who were major financial supporters of libertarian and conservative causes in the United States during the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. They were the majority co-owners of the energy conglomerate Koch Industries, Inc., and Charles and David Koch became two of the wealthiest people in the United States as a result of the success of their company, Koch Industries, which is one of the largest privately-held corporations in the world.

Founder Fred C. Koch made his early riches through the development of a revolutionary thermal cracking technology, which converts petroleum into lighter oils and gasoline. The Koch brothers’ father was also a thermal cracker. Charles and David received their undergraduate and graduate degrees in engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), respectively, in 1959 and 1963. After Fred Koch’s death in 1967, his Rock Island Oil and Refining Company was passed down to his four sons: Charles, David, David’s twin brother, William, and Frederick.

Charles Koch was the first president of the company (born in 1933). Charles Koch was appointed chairman and chief executive officer of the corporation in 1967, and the company was renamed Koch Industries, Inc. in 1968. David joined the company in 1970 and rose through the ranks to become executive vice president. In 1983, Charles and David purchased William and Frederick Koch’s shares in Koch Industries for $1.1 billion, thereby doubling their investment.

Under Charles’ direction, the firm expanded its interests far outside the petroleum industry and boosted its yearly revenue by a factor of 250 in 40 years, reaching an estimated $100 billion in 2009, according to estimates. After announcing his retirement in 2018, David revealed that his health has deteriorated.

Charles and David Koch shared their father’s conservative political outlook, which was shaped by his membership in the John Birch Society, which he founded. When David was running for vice president in 1980, he was representing the Libertarian Party, which won slightly more than one percent of the popular vote that year.  This was accomplished by the annual contributions of millions of dollars to a slew of think tanks, foundations, and non-profit organizations, many of which they established or controlled.

This group includes, for example, the Cato Institute, which was co-founded by Charles Koch in 1977, and the Americans for Prosperity Foundation (originally Citizens for a Sound Economy, which was co-founded by David Koch in 1984), which generally advocated for laissez-faire economic policies, significantly lower taxes, restrictions on the rights of labor unions, the elimination or privatization of most public services and social welfare programs. Many of them were also vocal in their opposition to environmental regulations pertaining to the oil, gas, and chemical sectors.

A significant amount of money was spent by Koch Industries and its subsidiaries, as well as by the Koch brothers directly and through the organizations they financed, on political campaign contributions, lobbying, and state ballot initiatives. Americans for Prosperity Foundation, on the other hand, has assisted the emergence of anti-government Tea Party movements since 2009, organizing demonstrations and mobilizing voters while also funding commercials and producing policy recommendations.

Libertarian opponents of the Koch brothers have alleged that they have used their enormous wealth to manipulate the political process and public discourse in their company’s interest, as well as to advance policies that harm the middle class and the poor while undermining public health, worker’s rights, and environmental protection. Defenders of the brothers argued that the degree of their political influence had been exaggerated and that their political efforts were driven by a desire to improve economic freedom and prosperity for all citizens of the United States.

Libertarianism is a political theory that emphasizes the importance of individual liberty as the most important political value. Liberalism, the political theory associated with the English philosopher’s John Locke and John Stuart Mill, the Scottish economist Adam Smith, and the American statesman Thomas Jefferson, may be seen as a kind of conservatism. In terms of some natural or God-given individual rights, liberalism aims to define and defend the legitimate authority of the federal and state governments.

Government, in the opinion of liberals, should exist to preserve these and other individual rights, and liberals generally believe that government power should be limited to that which is necessary in order to accomplish this objective. Liberty-oriented liberals who place a heavy emphasis on the individual right to liberty are known as libertarians. It is their contention that the scope and powers of government should be limited in order to provide each individual with as much freedom of action as is consistent with a similar level of freedom for all other citizens. As a result, they think that individuals should be free to act and dispose of their property in whatever way they see fit, so long as their actions do not interfere with the equal freedom of others.

Liberalism and libertarianism have strong historical origins in Western philosophy and culture.  Some of the most influential Christian theologians, such as Tertullian in the second and third centuries and St. Thomas Aquinas in the thirteenth century, emphasized the importance of the individual’s moral worth as well as the division of the world into two realms, one of which was God’s domain and thus out of reach for the state to control.

Libertarianism was also impacted by discussions about slavery and private property that took place within Scholasticism. The concept of “self-mastery” (dominium), later known as “self-propriety,” “property in one’s person,” or “self-ownership,” was developed by scholastic thinkers such as Thomas Aquinas, Francisco de Vitoria, and Bartolomé de Las Casas, who showed that it could be used as the foundation of a system of individual rights (see below Libertarian philosophy).


They were particularly active in the Netherlands and England. For example, in the mid-16th century, the merchants of Antwerp successfully resisted the Holy Roman Emperor Charles V’s attempt to establish the Inquisition in their city, claiming that doing so would violate their traditional privileges and ruin their prosperity (and, as a result, reduce the emperor’s tax revenue). The English Parliament, through the Petition of Right (1628), protested King Charles I’s attempts to exact taxes and extort loans from private residents, to arrest subjects without due process of law, and to require subjects to quarter the king’s soldiers in their homes (see petition of right).

In the midst of the English Civil Wars (1642–51), the radical republican Leveler movement issued An Agreement of the People (1647), which is considered to be the earliest well-developed articulation of libertarianism. This document, which was presented to Parliament in 1649, encompassed the concepts of self-ownership and private property, legal equality, religious tolerance, and limited, representative democracy.

Career

In addition to being the co-owner and CEO of Koch Industries, Charles Koch is also an American businessman and philanthropist. The business was passed down to Charles and David by their father, Fred Koch, who launched it in 1940. With Charles at the head, the company expanded and grew to be one of the largest privately held corporations in America. Charles was one of four sons born into an industrialist’s family, and he showed early signs of intelligence and tenacity.

While in college, he excelled academically and attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he studied mechanical and chemical engineering, earning two Master’s degrees. Charles joined his father’s business, Rock Island Oil & Refining Company, after working for Arthur D. Little, Inc. for a while after finishing his studies. In honour of his father, he rose to the position of president of the company and renamed it Koch Industries. Additionally, he and his brother David have contributed significantly to libertarian and conservative think tanks and campaigns in the past. He has given millions of dollars to fund research, policy, and educational initiatives.

Mary and Fred Chase Koch welcomed Charles Koch into the world on November 1, 1935, in Wichita, Kansas. When he was a child, his father was an engineer who became an industrialist and formed Koch Industries. Frederick, David, and William are Charles’s three brothers, all of whom live in the United States.

To further his education in engineering, he enrolled in MIT in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In 1957, he graduated with a BS in general engineering and an M.S. in mechanical engineering. The next year, in 1960, he earned his M.S. in chemical engineering from another university. As soon as he graduated from college, he accepted a position with Arthur D Little, Inc. However, he returned to Wichita in 1961 to join his father’s business, Rock Island Oil & Refining Company, and worked there for only a few months before moving back to Wichita.

His family’s oil company had grown to be one of the largest in the area by the late 1960s, and he was keen to expand it. As president of the company in 1967, he changed its name to Koch Industries in tribute to his father. Since then, he’s also been the company’s chairman and CEO.

It took him years of hard work and dedication to build the company into what it is today—a multi-billion dollar conglomerate involved in everything from petrochemicals to chemicals to energy to fibres to fertilisers to pulp and paper.

As a director of Koch Industries, Entrust Financial Corp., and Georgia-Pacific LLC, paper and pulp products, he has also served on the boards of numerous other firms. The Koch Industries grew at an extraordinary rate under the leadership of Charles Koch and now has operations in more than 60 countries and employs more than 100,000 people globally.


With more than $70 billion invested in acquisitions and other capital expenditures in recent years, Koch Industries now owns Invista, Georgia-Pacific, Molex and Flint Hills Resources; Koch Pipeline, Koch Fertilizer, Koch Minerals, and Matador Cattle Company.

It is Charles Koch’s business philosophy of Market Based Management (MBM) that has made him one of the world’s richest men. In his 2007 book, ‘The Science of Success: How Market-Based Management Built the World’s Largest Private Company,’ he explores this theory in detail.

He’s a libertarian who supports free-market policies and advocacy groups. He is a supporter of the Cato Institute, the Institute for Humane Studies, the Bill of Rights Institute, and the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, all of which advocate for a free market economy. One of the most important factors in Koch Industries’ rapid growth has been Charles Koch’s role as the company’s co-owner, chairman of the board, and chief executive officer (CEO). It has also won more than 930 awards for safety, environmental excellence and community service as well as other other honours.

The Market-Based Management Institute, an educational non-profit, teaches students, educators, community leaders, and government officials the MBM concepts through their affiliation with Wichita State University (WSU). The American Legislative Exchange Council honoured him with the Adam Smith Award in 1994.

During his tenure at the New York Mercantile Exchange, he received the Directors’ Award for Global Energy Vision. The Association of Private Enterprise Education presented him with the Herman W. Lay Memorial Award in 2005 in honour of his contributions to the field of private enterprise education.

In 2011, he received the Philanthropy Roundtable’s William E. Simon Prize for Philanthropic Leadership. Charles and David Koch were also major financial supporters of libertarian and conservative causes in the United States in the late 20th and early 21st centuries; they were born in Wichita, Kansas; David Hamilton Koch was born in Wichita, Kansas; they died in Southampton, New York. As a result of their company’s success, Charles and David Koch have become two of America’s wealthiest men. – Charles Koch

It was Fred C. Koch’s development of a novel thermal cracking technology that made him wealthy in his youth, allowing him to turn crude oil into lighter oils and gasoline. For Charles and David’s master’s degrees in engineering, they attended the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Charles took over as chairman and CEO in 1967, and the corporation was renamed Koch Industries, Inc. in 1968 under his leadership. A decade later, he rose to the position of executive vice president. Charles and David bought William and Frederick Koch’s stake in Koch Industries for $1.1 billion in 1983. For the first time in 40 years, the corporation had a 250-fold gain in revenue, reaching an estimated $100 billion in 2009, under Charles’ leadership. As his health began to deteriorate in the latter part of 2017, David announced his retirement in 2018.

They inherited their father’s conservative political views, as Charles and David Koch were members of the John Birch Society at the time of their father’s death. David served as the Libertarian Party’s vice-presidential candidate in 1980, which garnered less than 1% of the popular vote.

The Cato Institute (the country’s first libertarian think tank, co-founded by Charles Koch in 1977) and the Americans for Prosperity Foundation (originally Citizens for a Sound Economy, co-founded by David Koch in 1984) generally supported laissez-faire economic policies, significantly lower taxes, restrictions on union powers, and the elimination or privatization of most public services and social welfare programs. Additionally, many of them argued against environmental regulations that would have affected the oil, gas, and chemical sectors. Over time, ExxonMobil’s financial support for climate change denial groups dwindled, with the Koch brothers taking over as the primary financial backer.

Large sums were also spent on political campaigns, lobbying, and state ballot measures by Koch Industries and its subsidiaries, as well as the Koch brothers and the organizations they financed individually and collectively. By putting on demonstrations, rallying people, paying commercials, and crafting policies, the Americans for Prosperity Foundation assisted the emergence of the anti-government Tea Party movement beginning in 2009. A biannual national conference on political issues, fundraising, and electoral strategy has been held by the Koch brothers since 2003. Industry executives, Republican Party leaders, conservative activists, and media have all attended.

Prominent left-leaning critics of the Koch brothers accused them of manipulating the political process and public discourse to favour policies that damaged the middle class and those in poverty, as well as policies that degraded worker rights and the environment. According to the brothers’ critics, their political actions were driven by the goal to expand economic freedom and wealth for all Americans, not by the desire to exert undue influence.

libertarianism is a political theory that emphasizes the importance of individual liberty. That political philosophy is often connected with English thinkers John Locke and John Stuart Mill as well as Scotsman Adam Smith and U.S. President Thomas Jefferson since it is liberal. Individual natural or God-given rights are central to liberalism’s attempt to define and justify the legitimate powers of government at all levels. Right to life, liberty, property, freedom of association and religion; right to a representative government; right to be treated equally before the law; right to seek one’s own moral vision of pleasure (the “good life”).

Under Charles’ direction, the firm expanded its interests far outside the petroleum industry and boosted its yearly revenue by a factor of 250 in 40 years, reaching an estimated $100 billion in 2009, according to estimates. After announcing his retirement in 2018, David revealed that his health has deteriorated.

Charles and David Koch shared their father’s conservative political outlook, which was shaped by his membership in the John Birch Society, which he founded. When David was running for vice president in 1980, he was representing the Libertarian Party, which won slightly more than one percent of the popular vote that year.  This was accomplished by the annual contributions of millions of dollars to a slew of think tanks, foundations, and non-profit organizations, many of which they established or controlled.

This group includes, for example, the Cato Institute, which was co-founded by Charles Koch in 1977, and the Americans for Prosperity Foundation (originally Citizens for a Sound Economy, which was co-founded by David Koch in 1984), which generally advocated for laissez-faire economic policies, significantly lower taxes, restrictions on the rights of labor unions, the elimination or privatization of most public services and social welfare programs. Many of them were also vocal in their opposition to environmental regulations pertaining to the oil, gas, and chemical sectors.

These and other individual rights are the focus of liberals, who argue that government power should be limited to what is required to defend these and other rights. It is the individual right to liberty that is emphasized most forcefully by libertarians. According to these advocates, the scope and powers of the government should be limited so that each individual is afforded the same degree of freedom as everyone else. Since they believe that individuals should be free to act and dispose of their property in a manner consistent with the equal freedom of others, they support this view.

Liberal and libertarian ideologies have a long history in Western culture. The concept of a higher moral code that applied to everyone and limited the power of even kings and governments was important to the religious and intellectual traditions of ancient Israel and Greece. People like Tertullian and St. Thomas Aquinas, who lived in the second and third centuries, and Tertullian himself in the thirteenth century, argued for a two-tiered view of reality, one of which was ruled by God and hence beyond the scope of human control.


Scholasticism’s debates on slavery and the private property also had an impact on libertarianism. Individual rights can be founded on the concept of “self-mastery,” or “self-propriety,” which Scholastic scholars like Thomas Aquinas, Francisco de Vitoria, and Bartolomé de Las Casas developed. They showed how this concept could be the basis for a system of individual rights (see below Libertarian philosophy).

Early libertarians, particularly those in the Netherlands and England, defended, developed, and radicalized existing conceptions of the rule of law, representative assemblies, and the rights of the people in response to the rise of royal absolutism in early modern Europe. Antwerp merchants, for example, successfully fought Charles V’s attempt to bring the Inquisition to their city in the mid-16th century, arguing that it would infringe on their ancient rights and harm the emperor’s tax revenue.

The English Parliament fought King Charles I’s attempts to levy taxes, compel private citizens to lend money, arrest people without trial, and force people to quarter the king’s soldiers with the Petition of Right (1628). (see petition of right). During the English Civil Wars (1642–51), radical republican Levelers created An Agreement of the People (1647), the earliest well-developed articulation of libertarianism. Self-ownership, private property, legal equality, religious tolerance, and limited, representative governance were all contained in the document presented to Parliament in 1649.

Charles Koch Contact Address, Phone Number, Email ID, Website
Email AddressNA
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/OfficialCharlesKoch
Fanmail Address (residence address)Wichita, Kansas, U.S.
Instagram Handlehttps://www.instagram.com/kochindustriesinc/?hl=en
Phone Number703.875.1766.
Snapchat IdNA
SpotifyNA
Texting NumberNA
Twitter https://twitter.com/kochindustries
Whatsapp No.NA



How to get Charles Koch Contact Information:

Charles Koch Facebook Fan Page: https://www.facebook.com/OfficialCharlesKoch

Charles Koch Instagram Profile: https://www.instagram.com/kochindustriesinc/?hl=en

Charles Koch Twitter Handle: https://twitter.com/kochindustries

Charles Koch YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/charleskochfndn

Charles Koch Official Website: NA


Charles Koch Contact Details:

Charles Koch WhatsApp Contact Details: 703.875.1766.

Charles Koch Address: Wichita, Kansas, U.S.

Charles Koch Phone Number: NA

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