Rowan Atkinson Phone Number, Contact Details, Whatsapp Number, Office Address, Email Id

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Rowan Atkinson Bio Data:

A renowned comic actor and writer, Rowan Atkinson is best known for his portrayal as ‘Mr. Bean’ in the blockbuster television series and two feature films of the same name, which he created with his brother Richard. He is a man with a pliant face who can transform his appearance from that of a total idiot to that of a snobby grandee in a split second. As an undergraduate at Oxford University, he discovered his natural gift for humour, and he hasn’t looked back since. ‘The Black Adder’, his performance in which he captivated audiences, is his most well-known work, aside from the rib-tickling comic series “Mr. Bean.”

He is frequently praised for his dark sense of humour as well as his ability to perform physical comedy. His early years saw him meet future screenwriter Richard Curtis, with whom he collaborated on comic lampoons that were first played at the Oxford Playhouse and afterwards at the Edinburgh Fringe. This led to his becoming well-known in his hometown and landing a role in the popular television comedy series ‘Not the Nine O’ Clock News,’ which he both wrote and starred in. He made his feature film debut in the James Bond thriller ‘Never Say Never Again’ and went on to star in a number of films, including ‘The Witches,’ ‘Four Weddings and a Funeral,’ ‘The Lion King,’ ‘Bean,’ ‘Johnny English,’ and ‘Keeping Mum.’ He has also appeared in a number of television shows, including ‘The Simpsons,’ ‘The Simpsons,’ and ‘The Simpsons


Rowan Sebastian Atkinson was born on January 6, 1955, in County Durham, England, to Eric Atkinson and Ella May. He is the son of Eric and Ella Atkinson. He is the youngest of the couple’s four children, and he was raised as a devout Anglican by his mother and father.

He went to Durham Choristers School, St. Bees School, and lastly Newcastle University, where he majored in Electrical Engineering and received his Bachelor of Science degree.

In 1975, he transferred to The Queen’s College, Oxford, to continue his Electrical Engineering studies. It was during this period that he was introduced to future screenwriter Richard Curtis, with whom he collaborated on sketches for the Oxford Playhouse and the Edinburgh Festival Fringe the following year, both of which were performed at the Oxford Playhouse. In 1978, he began his acting career by performing in a series of comic programmes for BBC Radio 3 called ‘The Atkinson People.’ This was the beginning of his professional acting career. Next year, he created an original pilot for a sitcom called “Canned Laughter” that was broadcast on PBS.

With Pamela Stephenson, Mel Smith, Griff Rhys Jones, and Chris Langham, he co-starred in a television comedy sketch show titled, “Not the Nine O’ Clock News,” which aired on the NBC network in 1979.

By virtue of his sitcom, he achieved significant local success. He then went on to appear in the mediaeval sitcom “The Black Adder,” first shown in 1983 and running for the next decade. Once again, he collaborated with Richard Curtis on the script for the show.

In 1983, he made his feature film debut in the James Bond blockbuster ‘Never Say Never Again,’ in which he played a supporting character. Later in the same year, he was cast in the leading role in the film ‘Dead on Time.’

In the years 1987 to 1989, while filming for the film ‘The Black Adder,’ he was invited to perform at the ‘Just for Laughs’ festival in Montreal. The Appointments of Dennis Jennings and The Tall Guy were both released around this period, and he was cast in both of them.

The horrible, clown Mr. Bean was cast in a show titled ‘Mr. Bean’ in 1990, and he starred as him. Atkinson had no idea that this series would have such a profound impact on his life and would help to establish him as one of the greatest British actor-comedians of all time as a result. His role in the film adaptation of Roald Dahl’s classic, ‘The Witches,’ was cast about the same time as his role in the novel.

In 1994, he received further fame for his role in the film ‘Four Weddings and a Funeral’ and for his voiceover work as Zazu, the bird in Disney’s ‘The Lion King.’ He has also appeared in several other films.

A number of ‘Mr. Bean’ sequels were produced, some of which were broadcast on television until 1995. Two years later, he was cast in the film adaptation of the popular television series ‘Bean,’ which was released in theatres on March 1, 2008. His role as Inspector ‘Raymond Fowler’ in the television series ‘The Thin Blue Line’ was also cast at this period.

In a series of films from 2001 to 2003, including “Rat Race,” “Johnny English,” “Scooby-Doo,” and “Love Actually,” he performed as a supporting actor in a variety of roles. After that, he appeared in the criminal comedy Keeping Mum, in which he shared the screen with Maggie Smith, Patrick Swayze, and Kristin Scott Thomas.

In addition to his supporting appearances, he achieved success with another ‘Bean’ film, which was a sequel to the original and was titled, ‘Mr. Bean’s Holiday,’ which was released in 2007. He also appeared in the film ‘Mr. Bean’s Holiday,’ which was released in 2007. ‘Oliver!’, directed by Rupert Goold, was his first stage role, which he performed in two years later.

‘Johnny English Reborn’, a sequel to the James Bond parody ‘Johnny English’, was released in 2011 and was a critical and commercial success at the box office. The following year, he issued an official proclamation announcing that he was formally retiring from the role of ‘Mr. Bean’ and that there would be no more television episodes or films based on the iconic character going forward. Quartermine’s Terms’ was performed in a theatre in London in 2013, and he was cast in an ostensible role in the play that same year.

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The hit television series ‘The Black Adder,’ created by Richard Curtis and Rowan Atkinson in 1983, starred Atkinson as well as Curtis. This show was voted as the’second-greatest British sitcom of all time’ and was also named as the ’20th best television show of all time’ by viewers. Rowan Atkinson, who played Edmund Blackadder in the series, established himself as one of the most talented performers of his generation as a result of his performance.

One of his major opuses is his role as “Mr. Bean” in the “Mr. Bean” television series that premiered in 1995. It is said that he conceived the character while still in college and that he had always wanted to portray such a character. Because of his one-of-a-kind physical humour and his interactions with people and circumstances from all walks of life, he was able to captivate audiences even though he ‘barely talked’ on television. During the show’s successful five-year run on television, Atkinson rose to national prominence in his part, and the show became so popular that it was adapted into two feature films in a short period of time. Formed in 2014, Rowan Atkinson has been in a relationship with actress Louise Ford. It was in December 2017 when she became the mother of Atkinson’s third kid.

Atkinson, the son of well-to-do Durham farmers, went to Durham Cathedral Choristers’ School after graduating from high school. He received his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, and then went on to complete his master’s degree at the University of Oxford. To satisfy an inner need, he took to the stage and started practising the facial contortions and manic comedic genius that would eventually make him famous. His collaboration with actor Richard Curtis and composer Howard Goodall began while he was a student at Oxford, and the three of them travelled to the Edinburgh Festival together. There, Atkinson’s legendary schoolmaster comic catapulted him to international prominence. In 1979, he was exposed to millions of British viewers through the satirical television show Not the Nine O’Clock News, and in 1981, he became the youngest person ever to perform in a one-man show in London’s West End, at the age of twenty-one.


In 1983, the first episode of Blackadder, created by Atkinson and Curtis, slithered onto the screens of the United Kingdom’s televisions. As they cajoled their way through history, from the Crusades to the conclusion of World War I, the show depicted the twisted relationship between four incarnations of the grovelling, cowardly Lord Blackadder and his foully skinned retainer, Baldrick, as they cajoled their way through history. The series established Atkinson as one of the most talented comedy actors in the United Kingdom. It also spawned the television series Mr. Bean (1990–95), which starred Atkinson as a pratfalling, practically silent idiot who bumbled his way through everyday events that were rendered comic by his awkwardness and scheming, among other things. Bean, a working-class character who transcended both the traditional bounds of English humour and the verbal repartee of Blackadder, gained millions of admirers worldwide for his work. Jacques Tati’s recurring character Monsieur Hulot, who appeared in Tati’s films from the mid-20th century, was said to have had an influence on the development of the role, which Atkinson accepted.

Mr. Bean was awarded the Golden Rose at the 1990 Montreux Festival, an International Emmy for best popular arts show in 1991, and an American Cable Ace Award in 1994. At its peak, it was the most watched comedy show on British television, with approximately 18 million viewers tuning in. It was in 1996 that the show made the transatlantic leap to American television, and it was in 1997 that Mr. Bean made his big screen debut in the motion picture Bean, and later in Mr. Bean’s Holiday (2007), in which the titular antihero takes on the country of France. In 2002, the figure was also the inspiration for an animated television series.

Between 1995 and 1996, Atkinson starred as Police Inspector Raymond Fowler in the television series The Thin Blue Line, which aired on CBS. In addition to Johnny English, his other film credits include The Witches (1990), which was based on Roald Dahl’s novel; Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994); Rat Race (2001); and Johnny English Reborn (2011), which was an espionage parody that was followed by two sequels, Johnny English Strikes Again (2012). (2018). He also appeared in the romantic comedy Love Actually, which was a huge hit (2003).

He argued that he was not a funny man despite his considerable accomplishments. Atkinson was a highly private person. “I’m fundamentally a rather quiet, dull person who just happens to be a performer,” he explained. In 2013, he was awarded the title of Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE) in recognition of his services to drama and charity. The University of Oxford is an English autonomous institution of higher learning located in Oxford, Oxfordshire, England, and is considered to be one of the world’s great institutions. It is located 50 miles (80 kilometres) north-northwest of London, along the upper course of the River Thames (which Oxonians refer to as the Isis).

The existence of schools at Oxford by the early 12th century is based on shaky historical evidence. After a century, a university had been created, possibly as a result of the expulsion of English students from the University of Paris in 1167, according to some sources. The University of Oxford was founded in 1836 as a replica of the University of Paris, with original faculties of theology, law, medicine, and liberal arts.

With the founding of many religious orders, primarily Dominicans and Franciscans, in the town of Oxford throughout the 13th century, the university gained further strength, particularly in theology. During the university’s early years, there were no structures; instead, lectures were held in rented halls or churches. Originally, the various colleges of Oxford were little more than endowed boardinghouses for destitute scholars and other students. Their primary target audience was masters or bachelors of arts students who required financial aid in order to continue their education toward a higher level of education. The University College of Oxford was the first of these colleges to be established, in 1249. Balliol College was established about 1263, and Merton College was established around 1264.

At the beginning of Oxford’s history, the university’s reputation was built on theology and the liberal arts. But it also gave a more serious treatment to the physical sciences than the University of Paris did: Roger Bacon, after leaving the University of Paris, conducted his scientific experiments and lectured at Oxford from 1247 to 1257, a period during which he was the world’s foremost authority on the subject. During the 13th and 14th centuries, Bacon was one of numerous famous Franciscans who taught at the university, including Francis de Sales. Duns Scotus and William of Ockham were two of the other characters. John Wycliffe (c. 1330–84) worked as a resident doctor in Oxford for the majority of his life.

The university began to receive royal charters in the 13th century, but ecclesiastical foundations in Oxford town were suppressed during the Protestant Reformation, which began in 1517. The institution was founded in 1571 as a result of a piece of legislation passed by Parliament. In 1636, the university’s chancellor, Archbishop William Laud, established the institution’s rules and regulations. Professorships were first endowed in the early 16th century, according to historical records. Furthermore, during the later part of the 17th century, there was a significant surge in interest in scientific studies. Oxford’s prestige was boosted during the Renaissance, when Desiderius Erasmus brought fresh knowledge to the city and intellectuals such as William Grocyn, John Colet, and Sir Thomas More contributed to the university’s advancement. Since then, Oxford has maintained a high level of study and instruction in the classics, theology, and political science, earning it a national and international reputation for excellence.

Atkinson, the son of well-to-do Durham farmers, went to Durham Cathedral Choristers’ School after graduating from high school. He received his bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, and then went on to complete his master’s degree at the University of Oxford. To satisfy an inner need, he took to the stage and started practising the facial contortions and manic comedic genius that would eventually make him famous. His collaboration with actor Richard Curtis and composer Howard Goodall began while he was a student at Oxford, and the three of them travelled to the Edinburgh Festival together. There, Atkinson’s legendary schoolmaster comic catapulted him to international prominence. In 1979, he was exposed to millions of British viewers through the satirical television show Not the Nine O’Clock News, and in 1981, he became the youngest person ever to perform in a one-man show in London’s West End, at the age of twenty-one.

The number of students enrolled at the university, as well as the number of professors on staff, increased dramatically over the nineteenth century. Founded in 1878, Lady Margaret Hall College was the first women’s college in the University of Oxford, and women were first permitted to full membership in the university just a decade later, in 1920. The curriculum at Oxford University was modified during the twentieth century. Scientists were treated with greater respect and professionalism as time went on, and several new faculties were established, including departments of modern languages and economics. The number of people pursuing postgraduate degrees increased dramatically during the twentieth century.

Oxbridge has long been associated with some of the most famous figures in British history, including John Wesley and Cardinal Wolsey, Oscar Wilde and Sir Richard Burton, Cecil Rhodes and Sir Walter Raleigh, among many others. Both the astronomer Edmond Halley and the physicist Robert Boyle attended Oxford University, where they conducted some of their most important studies. PMs who attended Oxford include William Pitt the Elder, George Canning, Sir Robert Peel, William Gladstone, Lord Salisbury, H.H. Asquith, Clement Atlee, Anthony Eden and Harold Macmillan, as well as Edward Heath, Harold Wilson, and Margaret Thatcher. Many famous writers have had ties to Oxford University, including the authors Lewis Carroll, Charles Sturtevant Lewis, and J.R.R. Tolkien, who were members of the Inklings, a semi-formal literary group that met in Oxford during the mid-20th century.


There are a total of 14 colleges and collegial institutions at the University of Oxford, including All Souls (founded in 1438), Balliol (1263–68), Brasenose (1509), Christ Church (1546), Corpus Christi (1517), Exeter (1314), Green (1979), Harris Manchester (founded in 1786; inc. 1996), Hertford (founded 1740; inc. 1996), Jesus (1571), Keble (founded 1868; inc. 1870), Kel (founded 1283; inc. 1714). Blackfriars (established in 1921; formed in 1994), Campion (founded in 1896; founded in 1918), Greyfriars (founded 1910; founded in 1957), Regent’s Park College (founded in 1810; founded in 1957), St. Benet’s (founded in 1897; founded in 1918), and Wycliffe are among the university’s private halls (founded 1877; inc. 1996). Light projects a series of still photos on film, known as a motion picture or movie, onto a screen in quick succession, which is referred to as a film. A phenomenon known as persistence of vision is responsible for this illusion of real, smooth, and continuous movement.

Film is a remarkable medium for transmitting drama and, more importantly, for evoking emotional responses in the audience. The art of motion pictures is extremely complicated, needing contributions from practically all other disciplines, as well as a wide range of technical abilities and capabilities (for example, in sound recording, photography, and optics). This new art form, which first appeared at the end of the nineteenth century, quickly rose to become one of the most popular and influential media of the twentieth century and beyond.

Eric Atkinson and Ella May (Bainbridge) Atkinson welcomed Rowan Sebastian Atkinson into the world on January 6, 1955, in Consett, County Durham, United Kingdom. Rowan grew up on a farm with his two elder brothers, Rupert and Rodney, where his father was the landowner. He studied electrical engineering at Newcastle University and Oxford University, where he graduated with honours in both institutions. During that period, he met screenwriter Richard Curtis, with whom he collaborated on comedic revues that they presented on stage.

Not the Nine O’Clock News (1979), which he co-wrote and appeared in, was a tremendous success and inspired several best-selling novels, was another major achievement for him. For “Best Light Entertainment Program of 1980,” it won an International Emmy Award as well as the British Academy Award for “Best Light Entertainment Program.” For his portrayal in Not the Nine O’Clock News, he was awarded the “British Academy Award” and selected “BBC Personality of the Year” by the British Broadcasting Corporation (1979).

He was most known for his role as “Mr. Bean” in the television series Mr. Bean (1990), although he has also acted in a number of other programmes, including Blackadder (1982), Funny Business (1992), and Not the Nine O’Clock News (1979), among others.

The next year, he transferred to The Queen’s College, Oxford, to pursue a degree in Electrical Engineering further. He met future screenwriter Richard Curtis during this time period, and the two collaborated on skits for the Oxford Playhouse in the following year, as well as sketches for the Edinburgh Festival Fringe the following year, both of which were played at the Oxford Playhouse the following year. Beginning in 1978, he appeared in a series of humorous radio programmes for BBC Radio 3 titled ‘The Atkinson People,’ which launched his acting career.  The next year, he wrote and directed an original pilot for a sitcom called “Canned Laughter,” which aired on public television.

With Pamela Stephenson, Mel Smith, Griff Rhys Jones, and Chris Langham, he co-starred in the television comedy sketch show “Not the Nine O’ Clock News,” which aired on the NBC network in 1979 and was written and directed by Pamela Stephenson.

He was able to attain tremendous popularity in his hometown as a result of his sitcom. After that, he went on to star in the mediaeval sitcom “The Black Adder,” which premiered in 1983 and ran for the next decade. He worked on the screenplay for the show once again with Richard Curtis, who directed the show.

“Never Say Never Again” marked his feature film debut, in which he appeared as a supporting character, as part of the James Bond blockbuster “Never Say Never Again.” Soon after, he was cast in the major role of ‘Dead on Time,’ which was released later that year.

During the years 1987 to 1989, while working for the film ‘The Black Adder,’ he was invited to appear at the ‘Just for Laughs’ festival in Montreal, where he accepted the invitation. A couple of films, including The Appointments of Dennis Jennings and The Tall Guy, were released around the same time period, and he was cast in both of them.

Mr. Bean, the obnoxious clown, was cast in a 1990 television series titled ‘Mr. Bean,’ in which he appeared as himself. It was completely unexpected that this series would have such a tremendous effect on Atkinson’s life, and that it would assist to establish him as one of the greatest British actor-comedians of all time as a result of it. Casting for his role in the film adaptation of Roald Dahl’s iconic novel, ‘The Witches,’ took place around the same time as casting for his role in the novel.

In 1994, he gained even more notoriety for his appearance in the film ‘Four Weddings and a Funeral,’ as well as for his voiceover work as Zazu, the bird in Disney’s ‘The Lion King,’ both of which were released the same year. In addition, he has appeared in a number of other films.


Many ‘Mr. Bean’ sequels were made, some of which were broadcast on television until 1995, and others of which were not. He was cast in the film adaptation of the popular television series ‘Bean,’ which was released in theatres on March 1, 2008, two years after he first appeared in it. In addition, he was cast in the character of Inspector ‘Raymond Fowler’ in the television series ‘The Thin Blue Line’ during this time period.

From 2001 to 2003, he appeared in a number of films, including “Rat Race,” “Johnny English,” “Scooby-Doo,” and “Love Actually,” in which he played a range of supporting roles. Following that, he starred in the crime comedy Keeping Mum, in which he acted alongside Maggie Smith, Patrick Swayze, and Kristin Scott Thomas, among others.

As a result of his supporting roles and a sequel to the first “Mr. Bean” film, dubbed “Mr. Bean’s Holiday,” which was released in 2007, he was able to build on his previous popularity. He also participated in the 2007 film ‘Mr. Bean’s Holiday,’ in which he played the role of Mr. Bean. The character of Oliver in the Rupert Goold-directed play ‘Oliver!’ was his first professional theatre role, which he performed in two years later.

After the success of the James Bond parody ‘Johnny English’, a sequel to the James Bond spoof ‘Johnny English’ was released in 2011 to critical acclaim and monetary success at the box office.

The hit television series ‘The Black Adder,’ developed by Richard Curtis and Rowan Atkinson in 1983, features Atkinson in addition to Curtis as the title character. According to viewers, this show ranks as the “second-greatest British sitcom of all time,” as well as the “20th greatest television show of all time.” With his performance as Edmund Blackadder in the series, Rowan Atkinson cemented his reputation as one of the most talented actors his generation.

Rowan Atkinson Contact ,Address, Phone Number, Email ID, Website
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Fanmail Address (residence address)Rowan Atkinson, PBJ Management, 22 Rathbone Street, London, W1T 1LA, UK.
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Rowan Atkinson Contact Details:

Rowan Atkinson WhatsApp Contact Details: +44 (0)20 7287 1112

Rowan Atkinson Address:  Consett, County Durham, England

Rowan Atkinson Phone Number: +44 (0)20 7287 1112

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