Jimmy Carter Phone Number, Contact Details, Whatsapp Number, Office Address, Email Id

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Jimmy Carter Bio Data:

James Earl Carter Jr., better known as Jimmy Carter, was born on October 1, 1924, in Plains, Georgia, USA. The American President (2000), Americans (1978), and A Spy for Peace are among his many credits. Since July 7, 1946, he has been married to Rosalynn Carter. They have a family of four.

Younger siblings: James and Donnel and younger sister: Amy and younger brother: John William (Amy Lynn Carter). Southwestern College (1941-1942), Georgia Institute of Technology (1942-1943), and the United States Naval Academy (1946)

He was the 39th president of the United States, serving from 1977 to 1981 amid a time of great national and international crises.  His reelection campaign was a resounding failure due to the public’s dissatisfaction with his alleged incapacity to handle these issues. He was, however, honored with the Nobel Peace Prize in 2002 for his diplomatic and advocacy efforts both during and after his presidency.


Served as Georgia’s governor from January 12, 1971, to January 14, 1975, after being elected in 1970. The Carter Center was established in 1982 by former President Jimmy Carter after he returned to his native Georgia to work for international peace and human rights. As a result of its efforts, over 65 nations now have programs in place that aim to end the war, protect human rights, promote democracy, enhance health care, and rejuvenate metropolitan areas. He and his wife, Rosalynn Carter, remain in their Plains home.

His mother, Lillian Gordy Carter, was a registered nurse who volunteered in India as a Peace Corps volunteer at the tender age of 68, and her father, Earl Carter, was a peanut warehouser who served in the Georgia state legislature. Carter attended Georgia Southwestern College before transferring to Georgia Institute of Technology, where he graduated in 1946. In the Navy, he served five years as a submarine officer, where he met Rosalynn Smith (Rosalynn Carter), who was born and raised in Carter’s birthplace of Plains, Georgia. When his father died in 1953, he was prepared to join the Seawolf submarine as an engineering officer. Following his resignation, Carter returned to his family’s peanut farm in Georgia to take over operations.

When he was elected to the Georgia State Senate in 1962, Carter began his political career by serving on the local school board. He was re-elected in 1964. In 1966, he ran for governor but lost, and he became unhappy and turned to Evangelical Christianity, becoming a born-again Baptist as a result of his conversion. Carter was at least tacitly a segregationist until he won a second term as governor in 1970. After declaring that “the time for racial discrimination is ended” in his inauguration address, he set about opening up Georgia’s government offices to African-Americans and women. The current maze of state agencies was streamlined and integrated into larger divisions while tougher budgetary procedures were imposed on them as governor. As a result, he gained notoriety across the country and was featured on the cover of Time magazine as a symbol of the “New South.”

Carter launched his bid for the Democratic nomination for president in 1974, soon before the end of his term as governor. Through diligent and meticulous campaigning, he managed to build a broad base of support, albeit without national political support or big backing. To assuage public distrust of the executive branch following the Watergate affair, Carter positioned himself as a Washington outsider with strong morals who could restore the public’s faith in the country’s leaders. Ironically, Carter’s moral position and candor provoked some controversy when he acknowledged to Playboy magazine during the campaign that he had “done adultery in [his] heart many times.”

Walter F. Mondale, a Democrat from Minnesota, was chosen as Carter’s running partner after he won the Democratic nomination in July 1976. Gerald R. Ford, the Republican incumbent president who had taken power after Nixon’s resignation in the wake of Watergate, faced Carter in the 1976 presidential election. It was widely felt that Ford’s gaffe on television in the final televised debate gave Carter the edge in the close race. After gaining 51% of the popular vote and 297 electoral votes, the Carter-Mondale ticket won the election in November of 1976, defeating Ford’s 240 electoral votes.

In public appearances, he wore casual clothing and spoke casually, and he gave numerous press conferences to diminish the pomp of the president. Carter presented a dizzying array of ambitious social, administrative, and economic reform plans early in his administration. However, despite Democratic majorities in both the House of Representatives and the Senate, several of these plans encountered opposition in Congress. Congress was more inclined to confront the executive branch in the post-Watergate era, but populist Carter was eager to condemn Congress and take his agenda directly to the American public. In either event, Carter’s inability to make his plans a reality in Congress hampered his administration’s performance, and by 1978 his initial popularity had waned as a result.


Carter’s reputation was further tarnished by two scandals. One of Carter’s closest allies, OMB Director Bert Lance, was accused of financial improprieties as a Georgia banker in the summer of 1977. When Carter stood by Lance (whom he eventually asked to resign and who later was cleared of all charges), many questioned the president’s supposed scruples. In the summer of 1980, Carter’s younger brother Billy was accused of serving as an influence broker for the Libyan dictatorship of Muammar al-Qaddafi, which tarnished Carter’s reputation slightly. Senate investigators decided that Billy acted inappropriately, but he had no actual effect on the president.

His retirement from the presidency of the United States, which began on January 20, 1981, is the longest in history. Previously, John Adams and Herbert Hoover held the record, from March 4, 1801, to July 4, 1826, and October 20, 1964, respectively. For the first time in the history of the United States, he will be the oldest serving president.

One vote per precinct in 1960 would have prevented John F. When more people went to the polls and voted in 1968, Humphrey would have been President and Nixon would not have been. when he made his closing remarks in the 1980 presidential debates

In his own way, John Wayne was a legend. He was a true hero in a time when there were few. As an icon representing the best of our nation’s character on and off screen, he was more than a hero. He was a personification of everything that made America great: toughness, uncompromising independence, a strong sense of personal conviction, and courage.

There can be no lasting agreement unless all sides win. “I believe this government has had the worst influence on the nation and the world as a whole.” (May 20th, 2007)) On Wednesday, August 17th, 1977, one day following Elvis Presley’s life-loss, he personally declared, “Elvis Presley’s death bereft our country of apart of itself. He was distinct and irreplaceable.” When I told my mother I was running for president, she responded, “president of what?”

We preserved our country at peace. We never went to war. We never dropped a bomb. We never fired a bullet. But still we attained our international ambitions. We provided peace to other people, including Egypt and Israel.

it would undoubtedly have led in the killing of maybe tens of thousands of Iranians who were innocent, and in the deaths of the hostages as well. In retrospect I don’t have any question that I did the correct thing.

Jimmy Carter Phone Number

We had to have six [helicopters], to bring back the captives. We planned on seven. At the last minute I purchased eight. And, unbelievably, three of them were decommissioned. One turned back to the aircraft carrier. One went down in a sandstorm in the desert, and the other experienced a hydraulic leak and crashed. Complete surprise to all of us, particularly to the military specialists. We lost three out of eight helicopters. So then we had to withdraw. But if I’d had one more helicopter we could have taken back our hostages, and I would have been looked upon as a far more successful president.

My father was the dominant figure in our family and in my life.  Every one of my successors has engaged in unnecessary wars. I think we could have addressed most of these conflicts in a peaceful way. And we share relatively little of our wealth with other people.

In foreign affairs, Carter garnered accolades for advocating worldwide human rights, yet his critics argued that his perspective of the world was unsophisticated. Carter’s idealism notwithstanding, his biggest triumphs were on the more pragmatic level of patient diplomacy. In 1977 he won two contracts between the United States and Panama that granted the latter control over the Panama Canal at the end of 1999 and guaranteed the neutrality of that waterway thereafter.

The tough negotiations—which lasted 13 days and were salvaged only by Carter’s dogged intervention—provided for the establishment of full diplomatic and commercial relations on the condition that Israel relinquishes the occupied Sinai Peninsula to Egypt.

On January 1, 1979, Carter established full diplomatic relations between the United States and China and concurrently terminated official ties with Taiwan. Carter withdrew the deal from consideration by the Senate in January 1980, however, after the Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan. He also established a ban on the shipment of American grain to the Soviet Union and lobbied for a U.S. boycott of the 1980 Summer Olympics planned to be held in Moscow.


Carter’s major foreign policy triumphs were obscured by a serious crisis in foreign affairs and by a wave of popular discontent over his economic measures. On November 4, 1979, a mob of Iranian students attacked the U.S. embassy in Tehrān and took the diplomatic employees their prisoner. Their acts, in response to the presence of the ousted shah (Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi) in the United States for medical treatment, were sanctioned by Iran’s revolutionary government, led by Shiʿi cleric Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

Jimmy Carter Relationship

Jimmy Carter was born on October 1, 1924, in Plains, Georgia, USA as James Earl Carter Jr. He is noted for his work on The American President (2000), Americans (1978), and A Spy for Peace. He has been married to Rosalynn Carter since July 7, 1946. They have four children.

Former President of the United States. Children: John William Carter, James Carter, Donnel Jeffrey Carter, Amy Carter (Amy Lynn Carter) (Amy Lynn Carter). Attended Georgia Southwestern College 1941-1942, GA Inst. Tech., 1942-1943, U.S. Naval Academy 1946.

His perceived inability to deal adequately with such concerns led to an overwhelming defeat in his attempt for reelection. However, for his work in diplomacy and campaigning, both during and after his administration, he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 2002.

In 1970, he was elected governor of Georgia; he served in that position from January 12, 1971, until January 14, 1975. After leaving the White House, Jimmy returned to Georgia, where he established the Carter Center in Atlanta in 1982 to promote peace and human rights across the world. Over the course of its history, the Center has launched initiatives in more than 65 countries to help resolve conflicts, prevent human rights abuses, develop democracy, enhance health, and rejuvenate cities. In Plains, he and his wife, Rosalynn Carter, have remained for the time being.

Carter was the son of Earl Carter, a peanut warehouse owner who had served in the Georgia state legislature, and Lillian Gordy Carter, a registered nurse who went to India as a Peace Corps volunteer when she was 68 years old. Carter attended Georgia Southwestern College and the Georgia Institute of Technology before graduating from the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, in 1946. Carter’s father, Earl Carter, had served in the Georgia state legislature. Following his marriage to Rosalynn Smith (Rosalynn Carter), who was from Carter’s little hometown of Plains, Georgia, he started on a seven-year military career in the United States Navy, during which he served aboard submarines for five years. When his father died in 1953, he was in the process of training to become an engineering officer on the submarine Seawolf. Carter gave up his commission and returned to his home state of Georgia to oversee the family’s peanut farming activities.

Carter began his political career by serving on the local board of education before being elected as a Democrat to the Georgia State Senate in 1962, where he was re-elected the following year and again in 1964. The failure of his candidacy for the governorship in 1966 left him feeling despondent. He found peace in Evangelical Christianity and converted to the Baptist faith, becoming a born-again Baptist. Carter at least tacitly supported segregationist policies prior to campaigning for governor a second time and won the election in 1970.. However, in his inauguration address, he declared that “the time for racial discrimination is past” and proceeded to open Georgia’s government offices to African-Americans—as well as to female citizens. His administration streamlined the state’s maze of agencies and consolidated them into larger groups, while also instituting more stringent budgeting procedures for each of the organizations he oversaw. His efforts garnered national recognition, culminating in his appearance on the cover of Time magazine as a symbol of both good government and the “New South.”


Carter launched his bid for the Democratic nomination for president in 1974, just a few months before his term as governor came to an end. In the absence of a national political basis or significant backing, he was able to build a large and diverse constituency through relentless and systematic campaigning efforts. With widespread public dissatisfaction over the Watergate scandal, which had raised widespread concerns about President Richard Nixon’s power and the integrity of the executive branch, Carter positioned himself as an outsider to Washington, D.C., a man of strong principles who could restore the confidence of the American people in their leaders. When Carter revealed in an interview with Playboy magazine during the campaign that he had “done adultery in [his] heart many times,” it sparked some controversy, which ironically reflected well on Carter’s moral attitude and candour.

In July 1976, Carter was nominated for president by the Democratic Party and chose liberal Sen. Walter F. Mondale of Minnesota to be his running mate. Carter’s opponent was Gerald R. Ford, the unelected Republican president who had taken over as president in 1974 after Richard Nixon resigned in the midst of the Watergate scandal. Carter won the election by a slim margin. A televised discussion between Carter and Ford caused many to conclude that the race had tilted in Carter’s favour after Ford made the mistake of declaring that eastern Europe was not dominated by the Soviet Union. During the November 1976 presidential election, the Carter-Mondale ticket triumphed by collecting 51 percent of the popular vote and obtaining 297 electoral votes against Ford’s 240 electoral votes.

In public appearances, he adopted a more casual attire and speech manner, gave frequent press conferences, and worked to diminish the pomp and circumstance surrounding the president. Carter embarked on a dizzying array of ambitious plans for social, administrative, and economic reform from the outset of his presidency. Despite Democratic majorities in both the House of Representatives and the Senate, however, most of those plans were met with hostility in Congress. As a result of the Watergate scandal, Congress was more prepared to challenge the executive branch than it had been previously; conversely, Carter the populist was quick to criticise Congress and to take his political agenda directly to the American people. In either event, Carter’s issues with Congress damaged the success of his administration, and by 1978, his initial popularity had waned as a result of his inability to turn his ideals into legislative reality, as evidenced by his inability to pass legislation.

Carter’s credibility was further harmed by two scandals. A Georgia banker was accused of financial improprieties in 1977, which led to the resignation of Bert Lance, the head of the White House Office of Management and Budget and one of Carter’s closest allies at the time. Carter’s decision to stand by Lance (whom he subsequently requested to leave and who was later found not guilty of all charges) caused many to question the president’s much-touted scruples. During the summer of 1980, Carter’s image suffered another setback, albeit this time it was less severe, when his younger brother, Billy (who was popularly viewed as a fool), was suspected of serving as an influence broker for the Libyan regime of Muammar al-Qaddafi. While Billy had acted in an inappropriate manner, Senate investigators decided that he had no genuine influence over the president.

He has the record for the longest retirement from the presidency of the United States, which began on January 20, 1981, and continues to this day. John Adams previously held the record from March 4, 1801 to July 4, 1826, and Herbert Hoover previously held the record from March 4, 1933 to October 20, 1964, both of which were broken by the assassination of John F. Kennedy in 1963. On Friday, October 1, 2021, he will become the first sitting President of the United States to reach the age of 97.

If one vote per precinct had been different in 1960, John F. Kennedy would not have been elected President of the United States. And, if a few more people had turned out to vote in 1968, Hubert Humphrey would have been elected President rather than Richard Nixon, who would have lost. When he delivered his closing statement during the 1980 Presidential debate

John Wayne was a legend in his own right. In an era when heroes were few and far between, he was the real deal. In addition to being a hero, he represented many of the characteristics that made America great – ruggedness, tough independence, a sense of personal conviction and courage – both on and off the screen that reflected the best of our national character – and was a symbol of many of the qualities that made America great.

No accord can be long-lasting unless both sides win the battle. “I believe that this government has had the most detrimental impact on the nation and the rest of the world than any other administration in history.” (20th of May, 2007)

On Wednesday, August 17th, 1977, one day after Elvis Presley’s death, he addressed the nation in his own words: “The death of Elvis Presley robbed our country of a piece of its own identity. He was one-of-a-kind and irreplaceable.” Upon hearing that I was running for president, my mother inquired as to my intentions: “president of what?”

We were successful in keeping our country at peace. We never went to war with anyone. We never detonated a nuclear device. We didn’t fire a single shot. Despite this, we were successful in achieving our international objectives. Other people, notably Egypt and Israel, have benefitted from our efforts. We restored normalcy to our relations with China, which had been strained for more than three decades. Because of the Panama Canal Treaty, we were able to bring about peace between the United States and the majority of Latin American countries. We established a cooperative working relationship with the Soviet Union.”


Harry Truman was my favorite president, and he was also the one I admired the most. When Truman left office, he continued to hold the same views. He was not a member of any corporate boards of directors. He didn’t travel the world giving talks for a lot of money, as some people believe.

it would almost certainly have ended in the murder of tens of thousands of innocent Iranians, as well as the deaths of the hostages. Now that I look back on it, I have no question that I made the right decision. Despite this, it was not a popular decision among the general people, and it was even less popular among my own White House aides at the time. This includes my wife.

[in response to the botched hostage rescue effort] We needed six [helicopters] to bring the captives back to safety. We had planned on seven people. I placed an order for eight at the last minute. Incredibly, three of them were decommissioned as a result of this. One turned around and returned to the aircraft carrier. One plane was destroyed by a sandstorm in the desert, and the other was destroyed by a hydraulic leak in the mountains. It came as a complete surprise to everyone, especially the military professionals. We lost three helicopters out of a total of eight. As a result, we were forced to withdraw. In the meantime, with one more helicopter, we could have brought our hostages home, and I would have been considered a significantly more successful president.

my father was the most important person in our family and my life. [on father] My father was the most important person in our family and my life. When it comes to America in 2012, my main concern is that every one of my successors has been involved in unnecessary conflicts. I believe that we could have settled the majority of these problems in a more peaceful manner. As a result, we don’t distribute much of our riches to other people. These actions are in direct conflict with the teachings of the Prince of Peace.

With regard to foreign policy, Carter was lauded for his advocacy of international human rights, yet his critics accused him of having a naive view of the world. Despite Carter’s idealistic tendencies, his most significant accomplishments were at the more pragmatic level of patient diplomacy. After securing two treaties between the United States and Panama in 1977, he was able to transfer ownership of the Panama Canal to the latter by the end of 1999 and ensure the neutrality of that waterway for the foreseeable future. During a presidential retreat in Camp David, Maryland, in 1978, Carter brought Egyptian President Anwar Sadat and Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin together and secured their agreement to the Camp David Accords, which brought an end to the state of war that had existed between the two countries since Israel’s founding in 1948.

The difficult negotiations, which lasted 13 days and were only saved by Carter’s tenacious intervention, provided for the establishment of full diplomatic and economic relations with Israel in exchange for Israel’s return of the occupied Sinai Peninsula to Egypt. Carter’s intervention was critical in saving the negotiations. Carter established full diplomatic relations between the United States and China on January 1, 1979, at the same time as the United States severed official ties with Taiwan.

A new bilateral strategic arms limitation treaty (SALT II) was also signed in Vienna in 1979 by President Jimmy Carter and Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev. SALT II was intended to establish parity in strategic nuclear weapons delivery systems between the two superpowers on terms that could be adequately verified by third parties. Following the Soviet Union’s invasion of Afghanistan in January 1980, Carter withdrew the treaty from consideration by the Senate. In addition, he imposed a ban on the shipment of American grain to the Soviet Union and pushed for the United States to boycott the 1980 Summer Olympics, which were to be hosted in Moscow at the time.

Carter’s significant foreign policy accomplishments were obscured by a catastrophic crisis in international affairs, as well as a wave of popular dissatisfaction with his economic policies during his presidency. In 1979, a mob of Iranian students attacked the United States embassy in Tehran and took hostages among the diplomatic personnel stationed there. Iranian revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini sanctioned their actions in response to the arrival in the United States of the ousted shah (Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi) for medical care, which he had sought in the United States.

Jimmy Carter Contact ,Address, Phone Number, Email ID, Website
Email AddressNA
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/presidentjimmycarter
Fanmail Address (residence address)Jimmy Carter, The Carter Center, One Copenhill, 453 Freedom Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30307, USA.
Instagram Handlehttps://www.instagram.com/jimmycarternps
Phone Number(404) 420-5100.
Snapchat IdNA
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Texting NumberNA
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Jimmy Carter Contact Details:

Jimmy Carter WhatsApp Contact Details: (404) 420-5100.

Jimmy Carter Address: Plains, Georgia, U.S.

Jimmy Carter Phone Number: (404) 420-5100.

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