Jackie Chan Phone Number, Contact Details, Whatsapp Number, Office Address, Email Id

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Jackie Chan Bio Data:

Chan Kong-sang, better known by his stage as Jackie Chan, is a world-renowned martial arts icon who has gained worldwide acclaim. He has had a distinguished career as an actor, director, producer, action choreographer, stuntman, and so on. He is well-known in both Asia and the West for his amazing comic timing as well as his impeccably choreographed combat style. Despite the fact that he has broken and injured nearly every part of his body, Chan is credited with performing all of his stunts entirely on his own. He has appeared in more than 100 films, both in Hong Kong and in Hollywood, with more than ten of them being his own directorial efforts. He has appeared in a number of well-known films, including ‘Rush Hour’, ‘Rush Hour2’, ‘Shanghai Knights’, ‘Shanghai Noon’, ‘The Tuxedo’, and ‘The Karate Kid,’ among others, and has received positive reviews for each of them. He began his professional career as a child actor in Hong Kong movies, and his natural talent and dedication quickly established him as a well-known personality in the entertainment industry. In 2012, during the Cannes Film Festival, he announced that he would be announcing a semi-retirement from action films since he needed to focus on taking care of his health at the time.


Chan Kong-sang Chan was born on April 7, 1954, in British Hong Kong, to Charles and Lee-Lee Chan. He is the son of Charles Chan and Lee-Lee Chan. His parents were refugees from the Chinese Civil War, and they worked for the French ambassador in Hong Kong at the time of their son’s birth.

His father was sent to Canberra, Australia, in 1960 to work for the American Embassy. Jackie Chan was born there in 1961. Chan began training at the Chinese Opera Research Institute in Hong Kong about this time, where he received instruction in music, dance, and traditional martial arts. There, he became a member of a theatrical troupe known as the Seven Little Fortunes.

Jackie Chan had his acting debut in the film ‘Big and Little Wong Tin Bar’ in 1962, when he was eight years old, alongside his fellow members of the performance group. This resulted in his appearance in another film the following year, titled ‘The Love Eterne.’ Following that, he continued to make cameo appearances in films such as ‘Come Drink with Me’ (1966) and ‘A Touch of Zen’ (1967). (1971).

He also worked as a stuntman in the Bruce Lee flicks ‘Fist of Fury’ and ‘Enter the Dragon’ for a brief period of time.

In 1973, at the age of 19, Jackie Chan landed his first major role in the film ‘Little Tiger of Canton,’ followed by a role in the comedy film ‘All in the Family,’ both of which were directed by Jackie Chan (1975). It was in this film that Chan had his first nude sex scene. He made the decision to go from action movies to comedic films because his action films have been a flop up until this point.

In 1976, he moved to Australia with his family, where he began working as a construction worker the following year. A fellow construction worker named Jack took him under his supervision when he was in Australia, and he was given the nickname “Jackie.” In 1976, Jackie Chan was approached by a Hong Kong film producer named Willie Chan with the possibility to work as a stuntman in his film. This particular film was titled ‘New Fist of Fury,’ and Chan played the major character. The film went poorly because Chan was unable to demonstrate Bruce Lee’s martial arts style, despite the fact that the entire film was intended to be fashioned after his technique.

In 1978, Chan appeared in the film ‘Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow,’ which was a critical and commercial triumph for him and helped launch his film career. Chan was given complete creative control over how he staged his stunts. This film is credited with helping to pioneer the humorous kung fu genre, which went on to become extremely popular among the Hong Kong public.


Following the death of martial arts prodigy Bruce Lee, Chan was compelled to follow in his footsteps. Chan, on the other hand, determined to develop his own style of filmmaking. In the year 1978, he was proclaimed to be the most popular martial arts superstar in all of Asia, according to a survey conducted at the time.

‘The Young Master,’ his first feature film, was released in 1980. This film was a smash hit, and it is widely regarded as the first innovative combination of slapstick humour and martial arts in cinema history.

In 1961, the family relocated to Canberra, Australia, but the following year, Chan’s parents transferred him back to Hong Kong, where he attended a stringent boarding school that prepared kids for Jingxi (sword fighting). His training in acrobatics, singing, martial arts, and mime began when he was seven years old and led to a place with a professional tumbling group, as well as a few small appearances as a child actor and, later, as a stuntman.

In 1976–1978, the independent film producer Lo Wei cast him in a series of mediocre kung fu films in the hopes of finding a successor to the late Bruce Lee. The films were released in China. As an alternative to emulating Lee’s tough demeanor, Chan used his own brand of fumbling physical comedy in his first two popular films, She xing diao shou (Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow) and Zui Quan (Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow) (Drunken Master). After that, he wrote and directed Xiao Quan guai Zhao, in which he also starred (1979; The Fearless Hyena).

When he made his feature film debut with Shi di chu ma (1980; The Young Master), Chan held entire creative control over the project. He worked with the production company Golden Harvest, which he later helped develop into Hong Kong’s largest film empire.

The early 1980s marked the beginning of his transition from traditional martial arts period films to modern action-adventure films such as ‘A’ jihua (1983; Project A) and Jing cha gu shi (1985; Police Story), as well as their sequels. At the time, he was making an unsuccessful foray into English-language cinema.

His fight and stunt choreography skills were on display in the movie, which displayed his directorial abilities. His own stunts were frequently extremely risky; in Lung hing foo dai (1986; Armour of God), he came dangerously close to death after a fall that broke his skull and caused him to lose his hearing.

Learn about Jackie Chan’s honorary Academy Award, which was given to him in 2016 for his contributions to the cinema business. Learn about Jackie Chan’s honorary Academy Award, which was given to him in 2016 for his contributions to the cinema business.

In 1982, he directed and starred in another film, titled ‘Dragon Lord,’ which was released worldwide. The stunts in this film were quite sophisticated, and he experimented with them extensively.

A risky stunt-driven style of martial arts was featured in the 1983 film “Project A,” in which Chan was cast as the lead character. The Best Action Design Award was given to this film at the 3rd annual Hong Kong Film Awards, and it was announced as the winner.

In 1985, Jackie Chan produced and directed the action-comedy ‘Police Story,’ which was heavily influenced by Hollywood and in which he also appeared. The film won the Best Film award at the Hong Kong Film Awards, which were held in November.

Jackie Chan founded the ‘Jackie Chan Stuntmen Association’ in 1985 after a number of stuntmen were injured while filming the film ‘Police Story,’ and no one wanted to work with Chan again after that incident. This organisation was established with the goal of ensuring the safety and well-being of stuntmen.

In 1987, he starred in and directed the film ‘Armour of God,’ which went on to become his most successful domestic release to date at the box office. It was estimated to have brought in approximately 35 million Hong Kong dollars. Following this, he produced the film ‘Miracles – Mr Canton and Lady Rose,’ which was also a commercial success. As a result of the success of these two films, Chan established the production firm known as the ‘Golden Way.’ From 1988 to 1998, a slew of film and television projects, including ‘Rumble in the Box,’ ‘Armour of God II: Operation Condor,’ ‘Police Story 3: Super Cop,’ ‘Drunken Master II,’ and ‘Police Story 4: First Strike,’ began to come his way from Hollywood, including: ‘Rumble in the Box,’ ‘Armour of God II: Operation Condor,’ ‘Armour of God Initially, Chan was approached about playing the villain in Hollywood films, but he declined because he did not want to play the traditional roles or play a stereotypical character. A role in Sylvester Stallone’s film “Demolition Man” had been offered to him, but he turned down the role. Despite his inadequate mastery of the English language, he was offered more and more roles as time went on.

In 1998, Chan appeared in the Hollywood film ‘Rush Hour,’ which was a tremendous success at the box office and earned him a Golden Globe nomination. He co-starred in the film with comedian Chris Tucker, who played the title role. Because of the tremendous popularity of this film, both actors reunited for the sequel ‘Rush Hour 2’ in 2001. As a result, he has appeared in numerous high-profile films, including ‘The Tuxedo,’ ‘Shanghai Knights,’ and ‘Shanghai Noon’ (opposite Owen Wilson).

Chan provided the voice of the character ‘Shang’ in the film ‘Mulan,’ as well as singing on the film’s original soundtrack. In addition, from 2000 to 2005, he contributed his voice to the animation ‘Jackie Chan Adventures,’ which featured a character based on his own name.


His collaboration with British comedian Lee Evans and actress Claire Forlani in the 2003 film ‘The Medallion’ was a highlight of his career. The box office performance of this film was disappointing.

In 2004, he was a part of the film ‘Around the World in 80 Days,’ which was a moderate box-office hit at the time. “The Huadu Chronicles: Blade of the Rose,” “New Police Story,” “The Myth,” and “Robin-B-Hood” were some of the titles that came out in 2005 from him. I “Rush Hour 3,” in which Chan co-starred with Roman Polanski, generated over 258 million US dollars in box office revenue in 2007.

The Karate Kid was remade in 2011, with Jackie Chan and Will Smith’s son Jaden Smith as the main characters. The film was a huge success at the box office, grossing more than 358 million US dollars worldwide. It was the most talked-about film of the year, and it featured a unique fusion of Chinese and American martial arts techniques.

The year 2011 saw the release of ‘1911,’ which was the 100th film of his career. This is his first feature-length directing effort since the 1998 film ‘Who Am I?’ “The Young Master” and “Dragon Lord” were the first two feature films directed by Chan, which were released in 1980 and 1982, respectively. Both films performed exceptionally well at the Hong Kong box office, and the films were notable for introducing new innovations in humour and martial arts feats that had previously been unheard of.

The 1987 film ‘Armour of God’ was a big hit at the box office, grossing more than 35 million Hong Kong dollars worldwide. It was a great hit at the box office when it was released in 1998, and it also starred Chris Tucker, which helped him to establish himself more firmly in the western world.

Chan has claimed that he was born into a destitute household, and that his parents offered to sell him to the British doctor who delivered him when he was a young child. Chan had an extramarital romance with a woman named Elaine Ng Yi-Lei, with whom he had a daughter in 1999 named Etta. Chan and Elaine had an affair outside of his marriage. Etta was never recognised as Chan’s daughter in any official capacity.

The Hong Kong National Football Team, the England National Football Team, and Manchester City are all teams that he loves as a passionate football fan.

Chan has wounded himself numerous times while performing his own stunts, including breaking his nose, ankle, fingers in the hand, cheekbones, and head, among other things. It is well-known that he came dangerously close to death while filming the movie ‘Armour of God.’ It is because of this that he is unable to obtain insurance in the United States. Chan was born to destitute parents in Hong Kong. In 1961, the family relocated to Canberra, Australia, but the following year, Chan’s parents transferred him back to Hong Kong, where he attended a stringent boarding school that prepared kids for Jingxi (sword fighting). His training in acrobatics, singing, martial arts, and mime began when he was seven years old and led to a place with a professional tumbling group, as well as a few small appearances as a child actor and, later, as a stuntman.

In 1976–1978, the independent film producer Lo Wei cast him in a series of mediocre kung fu films in the hopes of finding a successor to the late Bruce Lee. The films were released in China. As an alternative to emulating Lee’s tough demeanour, Chan used his own brand of fumbling physical comedy in his first two popular films, She xing diao shou (Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow) and Zui quan (Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow) (Drunken Master). After that, he wrote and directed Xiao quan guai zhao, in which he also starred (1979; The Fearless Hyena).

When he made his feature film debut with Shi di chu ma (1980; The Young Master), Chan held entire creative control over the project. He worked with the production company Golden Harvest, which he later helped develop into Hong Kong’s largest film empire. The early 1980s marked the beginning of his transition from traditional martial arts period films to modern action-adventure films such as ‘A’ jihua (1983; Project A) and Jing cha gu shi (1985; Police Story), as well as their sequels. At the time, he was making an unsuccessful foray into English-language cinema. His fight and stunt choreography skills were on display in the movie, which displayed his directorial abilities. His own stunts were frequently extremely risky; in Lung hing foo dai (1986; Armour of God), he came dangerously close to death after a fall that broke his skull and caused him to lose his hearing.

Chan was ultimately successful in breaking into the American market in the 1990s. In 1995, he was honoured with the MTV Lifetime Achievement Award, and the following year, his blockbuster Hung fan kui (1995; Rumble in the Bronx) was released in the United States, along with a number of his other legendary Hong Kong productions. Rush Hour (1998), in which Chan co-starred with American comedian Chris Tucker, was a critical and commercial triumph and spawned two sequels (2001 and 2007).


Chan continued to work both within the Hollywood system (though he despised the restrictions placed on actors by the system) and in Hong Kong cinema after leaving the United States. The Spy Next Door and The Tuxedo were among the films in which he acted in the United States, as were Shanghai Noon (2000) and The Tuxedo (2002). (2010). Later, Chan appeared in the revenge thriller The Foreigner and a remake of the 1984 action film The Karate Kid, both of which were directed by Chan (2017). Kung Fu Panda (2008) and its sequels (2011 and 2016), The Nut Job 2: Nutty by Nature (2017), and The LEGO Ninjago Movie are among the films in which he has provided voice work (2017).

Among his Chinese-language films were Xin jing ga gu shi (2004; New Police Story), Bo bui gai wak (2006; Baby), Xinhai geming (2011; 1911), a historical drama in which he starred as Chinese revolutionary Huang Xing; Shen tan Pu Songling (2019; The Knight of Shadows: Between Yin and Yang); and Vanguard (2019; The Knight of Shadows: Between Yin and Yang) (2020). With the honorary Academy Award he received in 2016, Chan became the first Chinese actor to win the accolade. The award praised Chan’s “distinctive worldwide career.”

After leaving the entertainment sector in 1984, Chan embarked on a musical career in Hong Kong, releasing a number of unique albums over the course of his career. In 1998, he established the Jackie Chan Charitable Organization, which among other things provides scholarships to Hong Kong youths. He has also served as a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). A martial art, kung fu (Chinese [Wade-Giles romanization]: “skill”), also known as gongfu (Pinyin: gongfu), is both a type of exercise with a spiritual dimension derived from focus and self-discipline as well as an unarmed technique of personal fighting commonly equated with karate or tae kwon do. It is also possible to use the phrase kung fu to refer to the thorough preparation necessary for the performance of any skillful endeavour without the intrusion of the intellect or emotions.

Kung fu as a martial technique can be traced back to the Zhou era (1111–255 BC) and possibly even earlier. It was first used as a kind of exercise by the Daoists in the 5th century BC. In addition to being based on detailed studies of human skeletal and muscular architecture and physiology, it makes extensive use of muscle coordination to achieve the prescribed postures and actions. In kung fu, the different moves, the majority of which are imitations of animal fighting methods, are begun from one of five fundamental foot positions: the regular upright posture, the four stances known as dragon, frog, horse riding, and snake, and the fifth stance known as lion. There are hundreds of different forms of kung fu, and tactics for both armed and unarmed combat have been devised. When kung fu methods and philosophies were depicted in action films during the later part of the twentieth century, it helped to raise international awareness of the art form and promote its popularity. See also the term “martial art.”

Jackie Chan Relationship

Jackie Chan, originally Chan Kong-sang, was born on April 7, 1954, in Hong Kong, and is a Hong Kong-born Chinese stuntman, actor, and director whose perilous acrobatic stunts and engaging physical humor made him a star in Asia and helped to bring kung fu films into the mainstream of American cinema. Jackie Chan was born in Hong Kong and raised in Hong Kong. Chan’s parents were penniless when he was born in Hong Kong.

In 1961, the family relocated to Canberra, Australia, but the following year, Chan’s parents transferred him back to Hong Kong, where he attended a stringent boarding school that prepared kids for Jingxi (sword fighting). His training in acrobatics, singing, martial arts, and mime began when he was seven years old and led to a place with a professional tumbling group, as well as a few small appearances as a child actor and, later, as a stuntman.

In 1976–1978, the independent film producer Lo Wei cast him in a series of mediocre kung fu films in the hopes of finding a successor to the late Bruce Lee. The films were released in China. As an alternative to emulating Lee’s tough demeanor, Chan used his own brand of fumbling physical comedy in his first two popular films, She xing diao shou (Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow) and Zui Quan (Snake in the Eagle’s Shadow) (Drunken Master). After that, he wrote and directed Xiao Quan guai Zhao, in which he also starred (1979; The Fearless Hyena).

When he made his feature film debut with Shi di chu ma (1980; The Young Master), Chan held entire creative control over the project. He worked with the production company Golden Harvest, which he later helped develop into Hong Kong’s largest film empire.

The early 1980s marked the beginning of his transition from traditional martial arts period films to modern action-adventure films such as ‘A’ jihua (1983; Project A) and Jing cha gu shi (1985; Police Story), as well as their sequels. At the time, he was making an unsuccessful foray into English-language cinema.


His fight and stunt choreography skills were on display in the movie, which displayed his directorial abilities. His own stunts were frequently extremely risky; in Lung hing foo dai (1986; Armour of God), he came dangerously close to death after a fall that broke his skull and caused him to lose his hearing.

Learn about Jackie Chan’s honorary Academy Award, which was given to him in 2016 for his contributions to the cinema business. Learn about Jackie Chan’s honorary Academy Award, which was given to him in 2016 for his contributions to the cinema business.

See how actor-director Jackie Chan reacted when he was awarded an honorary Academy Award in 2016 for his films, some of which helped to popularise the martial arts genre. Chan was ultimately successful in breaking into the American market in the 1990s.

His father was sent to Canberra, Australia, in 1960 to work for the American Embassy. Jackie Chan was born there in 1961. Chan began training at the Chinese Opera Research Institute in Hong Kong about this time, where he received instruction in music, dance, and traditional martial arts. There, he became a member of a theatrical troupe known as the Seven Little Fortunes.

Jackie Chan had his acting debut in the film ‘Big and Little Wong Tin Bar’ in 1962, when he was eight years old, alongside his fellow members of the performance group. This resulted in his appearance in another film the following year, titled ‘The Love Eterne.’ Following that, he continued to make cameo appearances in films such as ‘Come Drink with Me’ (1966) and ‘A Touch of Zen’ (1967). (1971).

He also worked as a stuntman in the Bruce Lee flicks ‘Fist of Fury’ and ‘Enter the Dragon’ for a brief period of time.

In 1973, at the age of 19, Jackie Chan landed his first major role in the film ‘Little Tiger of Canton,’ followed by a role in the comedy film ‘All in the Family,’ both of which were directed by Jackie Chan (1975). It was in this film that Chan had his first nude sex scene. He made the decision to go from action movies to comedic films because his action films have been a flop up until this point.

In 1976, he moved to Australia with his family, where he began working as a construction worker the following year. A fellow construction worker named Jack took him under his supervision when he was in Australia, and he was given the nickname “Jackie.” In 1976, Jackie Chan was approached by a Hong Kong film producer named Willie Chan with the possibility to work as a stuntman in his film. This particular film was titled ‘New Fist of Fury,’ and Chan played the major character. The film went poorly because Chan was unable to demonstrate Bruce Lee’s martial arts style, despite the fact that the entire film was intended to be fashioned after his technique.

In 1995, he was honored with the MTV Lifetime Achievement Award, and the following year, his blockbuster Hung fan Kui (1995; Rumble in the Bronx) was released in the United States, along with a number of his other legendary Hong Kong productions. Rush Hour (1998), in which Chan co-starred with American comedian Chris Tucker, was a critical and commercial triumph and spawned two sequels (2001 and 2007).

Chan continued to work both within the Hollywood system (though he despised the restrictions placed on actors by the system) and in Hong Kong cinema after leaving the United States. The Spy Next Door and The Tuxedo were among the films in which he acted in the United States, as were Shanghai Noon (2000) and The Tuxedo (2002). (2010).

Later, Chan appeared in the revenge thriller The Foreigner and a remake of the 1984 action film The Karate Kid, both of which were directed by Chan (2017). Kung Fu Panda (2008) and its sequels (2011 and 2016), The Nut Job 2: Nutty by Nature (2017), and The LEGO Ninjago Movie are among the films in which he has provided voice work (2017).

The Knight of Shadows: Between Yin and Yang); and Vanguard (2019; The Knight of Shadows: Between Yin and Yang) (2020). With the honorary Academy Award he received in 2016, Chan became the first Chinese actor to win the accolade. The award praised Chan’s “distinctive worldwide career.”

After leaving the entertainment sector in 1984, Chan embarked on a musical career in Hong Kong, releasing a number of unique albums over the course of his career. In 1998, he established the Jackie Chan Charitable Organization, which among other things provides scholarships to Hong Kong youths. He has also served as a goodwill ambassador for the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF).

Jackie Chan ,Contact ,Address, Phone Number, Email ID, Website
Email AddressNA
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/jackie
Fanmail Address (residence address)Victoria Peak, British Hong Kong
Instagram Handlehttps://www.instagram.com/jackiechan/
Phone Number+ 852 2794 4274.
Snapchat IdNA
SpotifyNA
Texting NumberNA
Twitter https://twitter.com/EyeOfJackieChan
Whatsapp No.NA

How to get Jackie Chan Contact Information:

Jackie Chan Facebook Fan Page: https://www.facebook.com/jackie

Jackie Chan Instagram Profile: https://www.instagram.com/jackiechan/

Jackie Chan Twitter Handle: https://twitter.com/EyeOfJackieChan

Jackie Chan YouTube Channel: NA

Jackie Chan Official Website: NA


Jackie Chan Contact Details:

Jackie Chan WhatsApp Contact Details: + 852 2794 4274.

Jackie Chan Address: Victoria Peak, British Hong Kong

Jackie Chan Phone Number: + 852 2794 4274.

Jackie Chan Office address: NA

Jackie Chan Office Email Id: NA

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