Dick Cheney Phone Number, Contact Details, Whatsapp Number, Office Address, Email Id

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Dick Cheney Bio Data:

President George W. Bush appointed Dick Cheney as Vice President of the United States in 2001. He previously served as Secretary of Defense in the administration of President George H.W. Bush from 1989 to 1993.

His parents, Richard Herbert Cheney, a soil conservation agent, and Marjorie Lauraine Dickey Cheney, a homemaker, raised Cheney. He was born in Nebraska and raised in the Wyoming town of Casper. He enrolled at Yale University in 1959 but did not complete his degree. Cheney graduated from the University of Wyoming with bachelor’s and master’s degrees in political science in 1965 and 1966, respectively, and was a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Wisconsin in 1966.

On August 29, 1964, he tied the knot with Lynne Vincent. The University of Wisconsin awarded Cheney’s wife a doctorate in British literature while he was working as an aide to Wisconsin Gov. Warren Knowles. Later, she served as chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) from 1986 to 1993, during which time she was criticized by liberals for undermining the agency and by conservatives for opposing the closure of a controversial NEH-funded exhibit by photographer Robert Mapplethorpe in Cincinnati, Ohio, which had been funded by the NEH. Elizabeth and Mary, the couple’s two daughters, were born to them.

Cheney traveled to Washington, D.C., in 1968 to serve as a legislative fellow, and he began working in the Nixon administration in 1969 when the president was Richard Nixon. After a brief hiatus from government employment in 1973, he went on to work as a deputy assistant to President Gerald Ford in 1974, and then as his chief of staff from 1975 to 1977. In 1978, he was elected to the first of six terms in the United States House of Representatives, where he progressed through the ranks to become the Republican whip.


Cheney took conservative opinions on a variety of topics while serving in the House, including abortion, gun control, and environmental regulation, among others. He had his first of numerous small heart attacks in 1978, and he underwent quadruple-bypass surgery in 1988 to correct the problem. He served as Secretary of Defense in the George H.W. Bush administration from 1989 to 1993, during which time he presided over military reductions as a result of the Soviet Union’s disintegration.

Dick Cheney Phone Number

Cheney was also in charge of the United States military invasion of Panama and the participation of United States soldiers in the Persian Gulf War, among other things. After President Bush was defeated in his attempt for reelection in 1992, Cheney accepted a position as a fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank in Washington, DC. Upon joining the Halliburton Company, a supplier of technology and services to the oil and gas industries, he was appointed chairman and chief executive officer the following year.

Following George W. Bush’s primary victories, which clinched his nomination for the presidency of the United States, Cheney was nominated to serve as chairman of Bush’s search committee for a vice president. Only a handful of people anticipated that Cheney himself would eventually become the Republican vice presidential nominee. Cheney experienced another small heart attack two weeks after the election, but he was able to immediately return to his duties as the chief of President Bush’s presidential transition team.


As vice president, Cheney was involved and utilized his influence to assist establish the administration’s energy policy as well as its Middle East foreign policy. He played a pivotal and contentious role in the dissemination of intelligence reports indicating that Saddam Hussein of Iraq had developed weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) in violation of United Nations resolutions, reports that were used by the Bush administration to justify the invasion of Iraq and the subsequent invasion of Kuwait. Iraq, on the other hand, did not possess any weapons of mass destruction that could be discovered. The collapse of Iraq’s regime resulted in lucrative reconstruction contracts being awarded by the United States government to Cheney’s former company, Halliburton. These lucrative contracts raised questions about favoritism and possible wrongdoing, allegations that tarnished Cheney’s public reputation.

Members of Congress, who had long accused Cheney of being a secretive public servant, initiated a lawsuit against him for failing to disclose papers that were used to formulate the nation’s energy policy. After leaving office in 2009, Cheney continued to be visible in the media, frequently commenting on political issues. He had his fifth heart attack in 2010, which was the year before. Two years later, he underwent heart transplant surgery. It was published in 2011 that his autobiography, In My Time: A Personal and Political Memoir (which he co-authored with his daughter Liz Cheney) came out. Cheney has also written two books: Heart: An American Medical Odyssey (2013), co-authored with his heart surgeon, and Exceptional: Why the World Needs a Powerful America (2015), co-authored with his wife, Liz Cheney (2015).

a vice president of the United States of America is an officer of the highest rank immediately preceding the president of the United States, who assumes the presidency in the event of the president’s death, disability, resignation, or removal from office. Aside from his presidential duties, the vice president also acts as presiding officer of the United States Senate, a job that is primarily ceremonial but which grants the vice president the ability to break a tie when the Senate is deadlocked.

Dick Cheney Relationship

Nebraska is a state that is a constituent of the United States of America. It was added to the union as the 37th state on March 1, 1867, becoming the first state to do so. Nebraska is bordered to the north by the state of South Dakota, with the Missouri River forming approximately one-fourth of that boundary, and to the east by the states of Iowa and Missouri, which make up the entirety of Nebraska’s borders with those states.

The boundary with Kansas to the south was established when the Kansas-Nebraska Act, which founded the two territories in 1854, defined the line between the two territories. It is at a right angle (south and west) that the state’s border with Colorado forms, forming Nebraska’s panhandle, which is bordered to the west by Wyoming. The boundary with Colorado forms a right angle (south and west) in the state’s southwestern half, forming Nebraska’s panhandle. The state’s capital is located in Lincoln, which is in the state’s southeastern region.

Because of the building of railroads following the American Civil War (1861–65) and the subsequent influx of immigrants, Nebraska’s fertile soils were plowed, and the state’s grasslands gave rise to a burgeoning range cattle industry. The result is that since statehood, the state has been a major food producer in the country.

Rivers have had an essential role in the geography and development of Nebraska. The bulk of Nebraskans lives in or near the Missouri and Platte rivers, resulting in sparsely inhabited areas throughout much of the state. In the early nineteenth century, Missouri served as an important transportation route to the trans-Mississippi West. In addition, the Platte River has played an important part in the history of Nebraska. In truth, the state’s name is derived from the Oto Indian phrase Nebraska (“Flat Water”), which refers to the Platte River and the state’s geography. The total land area is 77,347 square miles (200,329 square km). Population (by 2020): 1,961,504 individuals.

It is one of Nebraska’s most unique features to be found in the Sand Hills region of north-central and northwestern Nebraska. It covers about one-fourth of the state’s land area and is characterized by undulating hills and valleys that range in elevation from 25 to 400 feet (8 to 120 meters). The Sand Hills area is beautiful rangeland, with numerous little lakes and luxuriant grasslands to enjoy.

Nebraska’s elevation ranges from a minimum of 840 feet (256 meters) above sea level in the southeast to a height of 5,426 feet (1,654 meters) above sea level near the Colorado and Wyoming state lines in the northwest and southwest, respectively. While the vast majority of Nebraska’s geography is gently rolling prairie, river valleys, part of south-central Nebraska, and a substantial chunk of the panhandle district are characterized by flatlands. Nebraska is located within the drainage system of the Missouri River; the Platte River, a significant Nebraska tributary, flows into Missouri south of Omaha.

The Platte River, despite being shallow and unnavigable, is critical to the state’s irrigation system. Despite the fact that both the North and South Platte rivers originate in Colorado and flow southwestward, the North Platte swings northward through Wyoming and westward before entering Nebraska, the river is formed by the confluence of the two. It is west of Omaha that the Elkhorn River enters the Platte, and it is also west of Omaha that the Loup River, which is created by three tributaries pouring out of the Sand Hills, enters the Platte.

The Republican and Big Blue rivers travel across southern Nebraska before flowing into the Missouri River in Kansas, where they join together to form the Missouri River. In extreme northern Nebraska, the Niobrara River flows, originating in the high area west of the Wyoming border and rising in the high country near the Wyoming border. The Ogallala Aquifer, a vast reservoir of underground water that has enabled the widespread use of good irrigation throughout Nebraska, lies beneath the majority of the state.


Nebraska’s soils are ideal for agricultural production. The prairie soils in the southeast, as well as the humus soils of central and northeastern Nebraska, are also valuable resources. In the southern Platte Valley and western prairie soil region, small-grain production is best suited to the soils found in these areas. Winter wheat grows well in western Nebraska because of the soil and limited precipitation. Because of the low amount of precipitation and the risk of erosion, the wind-deposited soil of the Sand Hills is only suitable for cattle grazing due to the risk of erosion. The alluvial soils of the Missouri and Platte river valleys, as well as the valleys of smaller streams, provide excellent conditions for growing corn (maize) and other crops, particularly in the Midwest.

Nebraska’s climate, like the climate of the greater Great Plains region, is characterized by extremes in temperature, wind speed, and precipitation, all of which can occur simultaneously. Similarly, there are considerable climatic changes from the easternmost portions of Nebraska to the centre and westernmost sections. Summer temperatures in Nebraska are frequently pushed into the 90s F (approximately 32 °C) by hot southwest winds, and temperatures can occasionally get above 100 °F (38 °C). The average temperature in July ranges from the mid-70s F (approximately 23 °C) in the panhandle to the upper 70s F (about 26 °C) in the southeast, with the lowest temperatures in the panhandle.

During the winter, northern winds frequently bring in Arctic air masses from Canada, resulting in temperatures that frequently fall well below zero degrees Fahrenheit (approximately 18 degrees Celsius). Low-pressure systems traveling eastward from the southwestern United States can deliver massive blizzards to Nebraska at any moment. Temperatures in January range from the mid-20s F (about 4 degrees Celsius) in the panhandle to about 20 degrees F (about 7 degrees Celsius) in the northeast. The average growing season in the Southeast is approximately 170 days, while the average growing season in the Panhandle is approximately 130 days.

A typical year’s worth of precipitation ranges from more than 30 inches (750 mm) in the southeast to less than 16 inches (400 mm) in the far western reaches of the state. Because a minimum of 20 inches (500 mm) of rainfall is commonly regarded as necessary for normal crop production, it is possible that approximately one-half of Nebraska is classified as semiarid. Nebraska was the first state in the country to observe Arbor Day, which was established in 1872 when Nebraskan politician J. Sterling Morton advocated for a day of tree planting to enhance the state’s largely treeless terrain.

Originally, Nebraska was covered with a diverse range of plains; however, the slopes of the river valleys are now densely forested with deciduous trees. Trees such as cottonwood, elm, and a few oaks and walnut can be found along the bluffs of eastern Nebraska, while conifers can be found in the Wild Cat and Pine Ridge highlands, as well as the Niobrara valley. The Nebraska National Forest, located in west-central Nebraska, was established as a consequence of a human effort to plant trees on the arid plains of the state.

Bison had wandered freely across the Nebraska plains until they were almost completely exterminated by the time of colonization in 1854 when the state was established. Some of these animals can still be found in their natural environment on the Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge, which is located near Valentine. Prairie dogs, coyotes, jackrabbits, skunks, and squirrels are all endemic to the state, as are antelope and deer, as well as a variety of other animals. The presence of migratory birds and pheasants is common.

Native Americans had been living in Nebraska for hundreds of years before European explorers first set foot on the continent. With the opening of the territory to settlement in 1854, the federal government established a reservation for the Omaha people in northeastern Nebraska, which was later converted into a reservation for Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) people who had been displaced from Wisconsin by the opening of the territory to settlement.

Some of Minnesota’s Santee Sioux were compelled to relocate to a reserve in northeastern Nebraska as a result of the relocation. It is still possible to visit the Omaha–Ho-Chunk and Santee Sioux reservations. In addition, the Iowa Tribe, the Sauk and Fox Tribes, and the Fox and Sauk Tribes each maintain a reservation in the state’s far southeastern corner. By the beginning of the twenty-first century, Native Americans constituted approximately one percent of the state’s population, with approximately one-third of them residing in Omaha and Lincoln.

Richard Bruce Cheney, better known as Dick Cheney, was the 46th Vice President of the United States under Republican President George W. Bush (2001–09) and the secretary of defense under Republican President George H.W. Bush (1989–93).

Richard Herbert Cheney, a soil conservationist, and Marjorie Lauraine Dickey Cheney raised their son, Cheney, as their only child. He was born in Nebraska and grew up in Casper, Wyoming. In 1959, he enrolled at Yale University, although he never completed his degree. Cheney obtained bachelor’s (1965) and master’s (1966) degrees in political science from the University of Wyoming and was a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Wisconsin.

He tied the knot with Lynne Vincent on that fateful August 29th, back in the ’60s. Cheney’s wife earned a degree in British literature from the University of Wisconsin while working as an aide to Wisconsin Governor Warren Knowles. The NEH, which she chaired from 1986 to 1993, was condemned by liberals for undermining the agency and conservatives for opposing the closing of a controversial NEH-funded display by photographer Robert Mapplethorpe in Cincinnati, Ohio. Elizabeth and Mary were the couple’s two children.

As a congressional fellow in 1968, Cheney came to D.C. and began working for President Richard Nixon’s administration in 1969. After briefly leaving government service in 1973, he served as Gerald Ford’s chief of staff from 1975 to 1977 as a deputy assistant. First elected from Wyoming in 1978, he served six terms in the House of Representatives as the Republican whip, rising to the position in 1990. While serving in Congress, Cheney advocated for conservative policies on a wide range of subjects, including abortion rights, gun control, and environmental protection. He had his first small heart attack in 1978, and he had quadruple-bypass surgery in 1988 as a result. As Secretary of Defense under President George H.W. Bush (1989–1993), he presided over cuts to the military following the dissolution of the Soviet Union. He also oversaw the US military invasion of Panama and the participation of US forces in the Persian Gulf War, both of which he was responsible for. Cheney joined the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think organization, after Bush’s 1992 reelection effort failed. As CEO and chairman of Halliburton in 1995, he oversaw the company’s technologies and services for the oil and gas industries.

Cheney was named chairman of Bush’s vice presidential search committee following Bush’s primary victories, which guaranteed his nomination for the President of the United States. Few imagined that Cheney himself would eventually become the Republican vice presidential nominee. Cheney suffered a second small heart attack two weeks after the election, but he immediately returned to his duties as Bush’s presidential transition team chairman.


To help shape the administration’s Middle East strategy and energy policy, Cheney was involved and exploited his influence. Conveying evidence that Saddam Hussein of Iraq had produced WMDs in defiance of UN resolutions was a central, controversial role played by him. These claims were utilized by the Bush administration to justify a military invasion of Iraq. However, no WMDs were discovered in Iraq. Ex-Halliburton CEO Dick Cheney received lucrative reconstruction contracts from the United States government following the fall of Saddam Hussein’s administration, generating the specter of favoritism and potential wrongdoing—allegations that tarnished Cheney’s public image. There have long been accusations against Cheney of being a secretive public servant, and he was sued by members of Congress for failing to release information crucial to formulating the country’s national energy policy. Cheney remained active in politics even after he left office in 2009, frequently appearing on television and radio to discuss current events. He had a heart attack for the fifth time in 2010. He received a new heart two years later. Liz Cheney’s co-authored memoir “In My Time: A Personal and Political Memoir” was published in 2011. Exceptional: Why the World Needs a Powerful America by Liz Cheney and Cheney’s heart surgeon, Heart: An American Medical Odyssey (2015).

US Vice President, Officer Next to President In Case Of President’s Death Or Disability, Resignation, Or Removal. The vice president also acts as the presiding officer of the U.S. Senate, a job that is primarily ceremonial but that gives the vice president the tie-breaking vote when the Senate is deadlocked.

The state of Nebraska is one of the 50 states that make up the Union of the United States. With South Dakota to the north and Iowa and Missouri to the east, Nebraska is bordered by the Missouri River, which accounts for nearly one-fourth of its northern boundary. The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 set the southern boundary between the two territories. Nebraska’s panhandle is formed by a right angle (south and west) between the state’s boundary with Colorado and the Wyoming-Colorado border. Lincoln, in the southeastern section of the state, is the capital.

There were many people who made their way north and west to the rich trapping area and settlement and mining frontiers that awaited anyone who made their way north and west to Nebraska during this time period. The fertile soils of Nebraska where plowed and the grasslands of the state gave rise to a range of cattle industry with the establishment of railroads following the American Civil War (1861–65). As a result, since its inception, the state has been a major producer of agricultural products.

The rivers of Nebraska have played a significant role in the state’s history and development. As a result, much of Nebraska remains sparsely inhabited, despite its proximity to the Missouri and Platte rivers. A significant thoroughfare for travelers heading west over the Mississippi in the early 19th century, Missouri served as a vital link in that chain. As Nebraska’s longest river, the Platte River has also had a considerable impact on its history. The Oto Indian word Nebraska (“Flat Water”), which refers to the Platte, is the source of the state’s name.

In the north-central and north-western parts of Nebraska, the Sand Hills are a prominent geographical feature. Located in the southeastern part of the state, it comprises rolling hills and valleys with elevations ranging from 25 to 400 feet (8 to 120 meters). With several small lakes and luxuriant grasslands, the Sand Hills area is wonderful rangeland.

Nebraska’s elevation ranges from a low of 840 feet (256 meters) above sea level in the southeast to a high of 5,426 feet (1,654 meters) above sea level near the Colorado and Wyoming borders. Much of Nebraska consists of gently rolling plains, with the exception of the river basins, southern Nebraska, and the panhandle section. The Platte, a large Nebraska tributary, meets the Missouri River south of Omaha, Nebraska, in the Missouri River drainage system. The Platte River is critical to the state’s irrigation system, despite its shallowness and lack of navigability. In addition to the North and South Platte rivers, which both originate in Colorado, the river is produced by the confluence of the two rivers, both of which go through Wyoming before entering Nebraska. West of Omaha, the Elkhorn River empties into the Platte, as does the Loup River, which is fed by three tributaries that emerge from the Sand Hills. The Republican and Big Blue rivers travel across southern Nebraska, draining into Missouri in Kansas through the Kansas River. The Niobrara, a fast-moving stream that originates in the high mountains west of the Wyoming border, runs through the far northern part of Nebraska. Most of Nebraska is submerged in the Ogallala Aquifer, a vast reservoir of water that has allowed for widespread use of good irrigation.

The state’s soils are ideal for farming. The prairie soils in the southeast and the humus soils of central and northeastern Nebraska are important. Small-grain production is better suited to the land south of the Platte River and west of the prairie soil area. Winter wheat adapts to the soil and minimal precipitation of western Nebraska. The wind-deposited soil of the Sand Hills is only suitable for cattle grazing due to the lack of precipitation and the danger of erosion. The alluvial soils of the Missouri and Platte river valleys and the valleys of minor streams are remarkable for cultivating corn (maize) and other crops.

The Great Plains region as a whole experiences extremes in temperature, wind speed, and rainfall. Likewise, there are considerable climatic changes from eastern Nebraska to the center and westernmost regions. Hot winds from the southwest often boost summer temperatures in Nebraska into the 90s F (approximately 32 °C) and sometimes above 100 °F (38 °C). Average July temperatures range from the mid-70s F (approximately 23 °C) in the panhandle to the upper 70s F (about 26 °C) in the southeast. Arctic air masses from Canada are routinely brought in by northern winds in the winter, and temperatures frequently fall below 0 °F (approximately 18 °C). Low-pressure systems traveling out of the southern states occasionally bring huge blizzards to Nebraska. Average January temperatures vary from the mid-20s F (approximately −4 °C) on the panhandle to around 20 °F (−7 °C) in the northeast. The Southeast has an average growing season of 170 days, whereas the Panhandle has an average growing season of 130 days.

The average annual precipitation varies from more than 30 inches (750 mm) in the southeast to less than 16 inches (400 mm) in the far west. About one-half of Nebraska is labeled semiarid because a minimum of 20 inches (500 mm) of rain is required for normal crop production. In 1872, Nebraskan politician J. Sterling Morton lobbied for a tree-planting day to improve the state’s largely treeless terrain, and thus Arbor Day was born in Nebraska. A vast diversity of plains previously covered Nebraska; currently, the slopes of the river valleys are well covered with deciduous trees. Cottonwood, elm, and some oak and walnut are found along the bluffs of eastern Nebraska, while conifers thrive in the Wild Cat and Pine Ridge highlands and the Niobrara basin. The Nebraska National Forest in west-central Nebraska developed from a human endeavor to plant trees on the bare plains.

Dick Cheney Contact Address, Phone Number, Email ID, Website
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Fanmail Address (residence address)Dick Cheney, American Enterprise Institute, 1789 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20036, USA.
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Dick Cheney WhatsApp Contact Details: (202) 862-5800

Dick Cheney Address: Lincoln, Nebraska, U.S.

Dick Cheney Phone Number: (202) 862-5800

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